What does retirement mean to you?

Laura at Cordova Pass Overlook October 2015I have observed that there are just about as many responses to the idea of retirement as there are people. Many count the days to retirement. They see it as complete freedom, and can’t wait!

Others fear that kind of freedom. They are convinced that they need to be contributing at all times, and feel driven to continue for reasons of self-esteem and/or legacy.

I believe this has a lot to do with early brainwashing. If your parents are driven to contribute, than you may also have that driving spirit. If your parents look forward to retirement as reward for a job well done, you may too.

My family is the hard-driving type, and my siblings also feel that they have no purpose if they cannot work.

My new husband at age 50 saw things differently. Because of serious health issues, he wasn’t able to hold down a 40+ hour a week job past age 60.

When I first met Mike ten years ago I was still quite driven. I launched myself into my new writing career with my usual enthusiasm and stubbornness, convinced that I could make it big as a blogger and author.

tell negative committee to shut upOver the past ten years my attitudes have changed dramatically. Mike has convinced me that being hard on myself and driven does not lead to contentment or even a happy life. It just leads to frustration with myself and others.

At what point is it OK to give yourself a break and say,   “You are fine just the way you are.” 

I have given much thought to my feelings about myself when I die. I do not believe that I will feel any better about myself then, if I produce more books or make any more money.

My time now is mine, and I plan to spend it doing whatever I choose, not feeling driven by my fears or my ego.

who you are supposed to be

Click on photos for full-size views, and follow us on TWITTER!

Advertisements

How my view of life has changed…

spring Buddha in backyard“…we all know how this ends, so rushing through life is senseless.  As our inner life grows ever more luminous, the chatter of the speed-and-greed world slowly fades, leaving us with greater peace, tranquility, quiet and contentment.”  —  Arthur Rosenfeld